How to Spot a Fake Designer Bag

How to spot a fake designer handbag

TIME

For the luxury consignment marketplace The RealReal, fake designer bags are a big deal. To weed out the counterfeits from the authentic goods, they employ a “team of luxury experts,” led by Graham Wetzbartger, the Director of Authentication.

In the above video from Fortune.com, Wetzbartger examines two similar totes, both allegedly Hermes, and explains what their team looks for during the authentication process. Watch to learn a few crucial tips for telling the leather from the pleather. This may not be an everyday skill, but it doesn’t hurt to be fully equipped for whatever bag situations could come your way.

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Should You Be Using Comparison Shopping Engines?

Niroma IT Services Pvt. Ltd.

Correlation Shopping Engines, otherwise called CSEs, have been developing in fame with online purchasers since the late 1990s. Generally as their title recommends, CSEs permit online customers to, basically, “look at” numerous stores without a moment’s delay for a specific item. Results are commonly rendered demonstrating different traits, for example, the title or item name, value, shipping and obviously the store which is putting forth the item.

What separates the different CSEs are their evaluating models, obliged fields inside of the information encourages and general one of a kind guest volume to every channel. In a December 2013 blog entry, GoDataFeed said that “The significant shopping motors consolidated have a span of 300 million special guests for each month.”

Evaluating Models
Most CSEs, similar to Amazon, Nextag, Shopzilla and Shopping.com utilize a CPC (Cost Per Click) evaluating model. They set least offers for the diverse items and classifications that…

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Transparency in a Startup

David Cummings on Startups

One of the items entrepreneurs frequently debate is the level of transparency to provide within their startup. How much information does a team member need to know? When does not enough information cause problems? While there’s no perfect answer, I’ve found that it’s better to err on the side of providing more information than expected.

Here are a few areas worth considering as part of the transparency question in a startup:

  • How much cash is in the bank?
  • What’s the monthly burn rate?
  • What are the key metrics for the business and where do things stand?
  • What are the key metrics for each department and where do things stand?
  • What goals need to be hit to raise the next round of financing (if applicable)?
  • What are the top three challenges in the business (some issues, like those that are personnel related, can’t be discussed company-wide)?
  • What’s on the Simplified One Page Strategic Plan

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Notes from the EndoChoice S-1 IPO Filing

David Cummings on Startups

EndoChoice went public today on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE:GI) raising $95 million. This is notable because it’s the first entrepreneur-lead company in Atlanta to go public in many years. Founded in 2008, EndoChoice is a medtech company focused on technologies and products for gastrointestinal conditions with their main innovation being an endoscopic imaging system.

Here are a few notes from the EndoChoice S-1 IPO filing:

  • Serves over 2,500 GI departments (pg. 1)
  • Fuse® system enables GI specialists to see more than twice the anatomy at any one time compared to standard, forward-viewing colonoscopes and has been clinically demonstrated to detect 69% more pre-cancerous polyps than standard colonoscopes. (pg. 1)
  • 15 million colonoscopies per year in the United States (pg. 1)
  • Revenues (pg. 2)
    2012 – $34.2 million
    2013 – $50.9 million
    2014 – $61.4 million
  • Net losses (pg. 2)
    2012 – $1.2 million
    2013 – $23.9…

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